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  • Homeland in Transit: Streetscapes

    Community Event: Let's have a drink and walk in the streets of Hong Kong Friday 2 September 18-20 or till it ends!

  • Difference / Indifference by Isaac Chong Wai for Kunsttage Base.

    Apply Now: info@isaacchongwai.com Apply now!

  • HONG KONG VIDEO NIGHT Programme is Online!

    Hong Kong Video Night Programme 20 May 2022 Freilager-Platz 9, Münchenstein/Basel 20 May 2022 1900 - 1915 European Premiere 1. Angela Su ‘This is Not a Game’ (2021), 11 mins 16 secs ​ 1915 - 2000 Artist Conversation with Angelika Li, PF25 cultural projects founder and curator Alexandra Stäheli, director of Atelier Mondial ​ 2000 - 2222 Screening 2. Kongkee ‘River’ (2020), Animation, 5 mins 3 secs 3. Kongkee ‘I just can't find myself, most of the time’ (2020), Animation, 1 min 56 secs 4. Lo Lai Lai Natalie ‘Cold Fire’ (2019-2020), 10 mins 18 secs 5. MAP Office ‘The Book of Waves’ (2018), Animation, 2 mins 6. Yim Sui Fong ‘Black Bird Island’ (2017), 6 mins 32 secs 7. Lo Lai Lai Natalie ‘Weather girl Halo Daisy’ (2016), 6 mins 32 secs 8. Luke Ching ‘Pixel’ (2014), 43 secs 9. Leung Chi Wo ‘Suck/Blow’ (2003), 4 mins 10. Law Yuk Mui ‘On Junk Bay, The Plant’ (1990-present), 2 mins 56 secs 11. May Fung ‘Image of a City’ (1990), 11 mins 12. May Fung ‘She Said Why Me’ (1989), 8 mins ​ Total of the video: 12 (approx. 71 mins) Click here for more info. Programme Curator: Angelika Li Visual Direction: Donald Mak Technical Team: Désirée and Celina Co-ordination: Kennis Falkner Co-presenters: PF25 cultural projects and Atelier Mondial Supporter: Christoph Merian Stiftung. ​ Image: Leung Chi Wo ‘Suck/Blow’ (2003), 4 mins. Courtest of the artist.

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  • HOMELAND in TRANSIT 2022

    2022 2021 2020 2019 2022 PROGRAMME EXHIBITION ​ STREETSCAPES Kunsttage Basel Community Event Let's have a drink and walk in the streets of Hong Kong Jungstrasse, 4056 Basel, Switzerland Friday 2 September 2022 18-20h​ ​ The Streetscapes project that premieres Hong Kong artist Hung Keung's latest video work in Basel invites the audience to bring an image that records the transformation in their city during the pandemic time together with a short description. The images and the texts will be pinned on a wall in the space to create a conversation and linking the stories of transformations between our cities. ​ Hung Keung will be virtually attending the event and joining curator Angelika Li, PF25 co-founder Donald Mak and our venue partner architect Raymond Gaëtan to exchange with the audience. Let's share our stories with some Hong Kong drinks and street food! ​ first-come-first-serve Special Hong Kong Treats for Participants! ​ Participants who share an image and stories will receive a voucher to taste some authentic Hong Kong-made Moon Cakes sponsored by Meow Kong and Curry Fish Balls prepared by Kennis Falkner at the event, also in celebration of the coming Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節 a.k.a. Full Moon Festival) on 15th day of the 8th month in the Lunar Calendar which falls on 10 September this year. Popular demand, first-come-first serve! ​ ​ ​ Streetscapes 24360 Hong Kong New Video Work by Hung Keung ​ ​ Hung Keung is interested in the transformative physics of stones and rocks. In the spirit of the traditional Chinese landscape art, landscapes are meant for us to visit, to live in or wander around in. During the pandemic time, people in Hong Kong always had to stay home as a preventive measure. This video captures an almost surreal streetscapes of Hong Kong around the clock and with the movement of the 360-degree camera which creates a tunnel of time and documents the transit of people and the city during this pivotal period. ​ The video consisting of two parts will be looped and on view showing a 360 degree day and night streetscapes of Hong Kong at the window on Jungstrasse 33, 4056 Basel from 1-4 September 18-18h as part of the Kunsttage Basel programme: ​ Streetscapes 24360 Hong Kong 2022 Digital Moving Images DAY: 90 mins NIGHT: 60 mins ​ Part of the architecture models made of cement in the video were referenced from this list of buildings in Hong Kong, some existing, surviving or demolished. ​ ​ ​ Homeland in Transit : Streetscape New Video Work by Hung Keung Curator: Angelika Li Kunsttage Basel 1-4 September 2022 18-18h Jungstrasse 33, 4056 Basel, Switzerland Presented by: PF25 cultural projects Venue Partner: Raymond Gaëtan Architecture & Development Event Sponsor: Meow Kong Supported by: Christoph Merian Stiftung ​ PF25 is a registered non-profit cultural organisation in Basel that needs your participation and support! ​ ​ CARRIED BY THE WIND 10 - 26 JUNE 2022 SALON MONDIAL BASEL/MÜNCHENSTEIN SWITZERLAND Vernissage: 10 June 2022 18-21h Exhibition: 11 - 26 June 2022 Fridays to Sundays: 12-18h Special opening dates 13-16 June: 14-18h Art Basel VIP Programme: 14 June 18-20h RSVP: Team@PF25.org Salon Mondial, Freilager-Platz 9, 4142 Münchenstein/Basel, Switzerland (Tram No. 11 to Freilager) A Group Exhibition of Hong Kong and Swiss artists: Oscar Chan Yik Long (Hong Kong, Helsinki) Isaac Chong Wai (Hong Kong, Berlin) Andreas Marti (Zürich) Kathrin Siegrist + Iva Wili (Basel) Angela Su (Hong Kong) Curated by Angelika Li (Hong Kong, Basel) Co-presented by Atelier Mondial and PF25 cultural projects Supported by Christoph Merian Stiftung Introduction The word ‘homeland’ evokes a physical and permanent form on the surface, yet when we dive a little deeper into our memories and emotions, the word urges us to reflect on its complex and shifting nature. The exhibition channels narratives of ‘homeland’: borders, boundaries, roots, diaspora, cultural identity, colonial ideologies and beyond. Wind is a symbol of change: the vital breath, flow of life. This familiar element can be pleasant and gentle as a breeze or a vigorous air energy as ‘hei3’ (氣) in Cantonese, yet it can be devastating and destructive as a hurricane or an accelerator for fire causing catastrophic damage. Wind also inspires the movements of thoughts and this Homeland in Transit chapter ‘Carried by the Wind’ is indebted to the captivating works by Bob Dylan, Sanmo, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Hayao Miyasaki and Wong Kar Wai. In our fast-expanding world of displacement and exile, the sense of homeland is being constantly questioned and reinterpreted. Does the nature of the wind change? How do we strike a balance and find harmony within? Does it carry our messages, dreams and hopes? In the exhibition, we will find out how the six artists from Hong Kong and Switzerland Oscar Chan Yik Long, Isaac Chong Wai, Andreas Marti, Kathrin Siegrist + Iva Wili and Angela Su perceive this powerful element of movement and how they represent it in their works in mediums ranging from ink paintings, videos, moving objects, to textile installations. Angelika Li Spring, 2022 ---> Curatorial Essay ---> Floor Plan ---> List of Work ---> Artists Biographies ---> Press Enquiry Photos documentation by Maris Mezulis Video and sound by Hedy Leung Courtesy the artists and PF25 cultural projects EXHIBITION HEIMAT IM WANDEL HOMELAND IN TRANSIT 5 - 22 MAY 2022 VILLA MEIER-SEVERINI ZOLLIKON, SWITZERLAND ​ HEIMAT im WANDEL / HOMELAND in TRANSIT Sonam Dolma Brauen, Hung Fai, Lee Ka Sing, Leung Chi Wo, MAP Office, Lulu Ngie and Wai Pong Yu Co-curated by Martin Brauen and Angelika Li ​ Vernissage: 5 May 2022, 18-20h Opening performance by Matthias Ziegler (Bassflöte, Kontrabassflöte) Exhibition: 6 – 26 May, Thur-Fri 17-20h, Sat-Sun 11-17h Finissage: 22 May, 18-20h Venue: Villa Meier-Severini, Zollikerstrasse 86, 8702 Zollikon, CH Organised by Kulturkreis Zollikon Press Preview: 5 May by appointment Enquiries: Martin Brauen / www.sonambrauen.net/ Angelika Li / www.onkili.com/ Photo documentation by Tashi Brauen ​ Introduction The word ‘homeland’ has complex meanings: a clearly defined place/space, a tradition/culture that you share with others, a common history, belonging to a certain community in which you feel at home - and thus also feelings such as security and trust. It evokes a permanent form on the surface, yet when we dive a little deeper into our memories and emotions, the word urges us to reflect on its shifting nature. The definition of ‘homeland’ fluctuates under socio-political pressures which can lead to alienation and discontent, and potential fragmentations in our societies. Postponed since March 2020 due to the pandemic, the second exhibition has transformed into the seventh chapter in the Homeland in Transit series with the German title HEIMAT im WANDEL in which Martin Brauen, cultural anthropologist specialising in Tibet and the Himalayas and curator, and Hong Kong curator Angelika Li attempt to interweave respective perspectives and experiences of Swiss-Tibetan artist Sonam Dolma Brauen, and six Hong Kong artists Hung Fai, Lee Ka Sing, Leung Chi Wo, MAP Office, Lulu Ngie and Wai Pong Yu. Despite many differences, the two places share something in common: the sense of homeland of its inhabitants is constantly being questioned and reinterpreted. How do the artists perceive these transformations and how do they represent it in their art? ​ ​ ​ yishen 34 by Sonam Dolma Wai Pong Yu - A Rhythm of Landscape detail light Book of Waves by MAP Office HUNG Fai 熊輝 VESSEL IV 2019 Ink on Chinese Paper 136 x 69 cm Sonam Dolma, Yishen 28, 2014, 94 x 138 cm MAP Office (Laurent Gutierrez, Valérie Portefaix) HONG KONG IS OUR MUSEUM 2006 White neon mounted on Photo: Nici Jost Vessel by Hung Fai A Rhythm of Landscape detail 1- PY WAI Pong Yu韋邦雨 LAKEDREAM 2 2019 Ballpoint pen on paper 68 x 100 cm Sonam Dolma, Yishen 71 2016 Acrylic on Canvas 34x34 cm Sonam Dolma, Abschied No 3 2017 Acrylic on Canvas 140 x 100 cm WAI Pong Yu韋邦雨 A RHYTHM OF LANDSCAPE 9 2019 Ballpoint pen on paper 57.5 x 68.4 cm My Name is Victoria by Leung Chi Wo LEE Ka Sing 李家昇 THE PART OF HISTORY THAT HAS NEVER BEEN TOLD 2010 Photographic work 40.64 x 50.8 cm Lulu NGIE倪鷺露 RECOGNISING IT 2019 Ink on paper mounted on silk 215 x 95 cm LEE Ka Sing 李家昇 EVERYBODY SAID CAMEL WAS THE FATHER OF GPS 2011 Editions: 4/10 & 5/10 Sonam Dolma, Gone with the wind LEUNG Chi Wo 梁志和 MY NAME IS VICTORIA 2008 Video: HDV, PAL, 21 min. 30 sec. Artist book: 15 x 21 cm yishen 11 by Sonam Dolma WAI Pong Yu A MOMENT OF TRUTH 57 2019 Archival Ballpoint Pen on Japanese Art Paper 29.7cm x 21cm WAI Pong Yu A Golden Bough 3, 2019, deta WAI Pong Yu A MOMENT OF TRUTH 55 2019 Archival Ballpoint Pen on Japanese Art Paper 29.7cm x 21cm lost childhood by Sonam Dolma About the Artists Press / Enquiry Contact​ ​ info@onkili.com

  • Angelika Li | ONKILI

    Contact info@onkili.com

  • HOMELAND in TRANSIT 2020

    2022 2021 2020 2019 HOMELAND in TRANSIT is a curatorial project conceptualised by Angelika Li in 2018 soon after her move from Hong Kong to Switzerland in 2017. "Where are you from?” This simple question opens up thoughts and conversations about the notion of homeland and triggered the idea of the curatorial project HOMELAND in TRANSIT. On the surface, the word 'homeland' recalls a physical and permanent form, yet when we dive a little deeper into our memories and emotions, the word urges us to reflect on its shifting nature. The inaugural exhibition in 2019 channeled narratives of ‘homeland’ from Hong Kong perspectives: borders, boundaries, roots, diaspora, cultural identity, colonial ideologies and beyond. Transiting through an extraordinary year... ​ HOMELAND in TRANSIT 2020 ​ Transitioning into a fresh decade and a new lunar zodiac 12-year cycle with unknown possibilities, we expand our community and explore new forms of exchange: first with a VIDEO TALKS series launched in Basel presenting works by Hong Kong artists May Fung and Law Yuk Mui in February before the CV19 regulations were introduced in Switzerland. Due to CV19, all of our programmes and activities scheduled for Asia have been postponed. ​ Entering autumn, the Berlin exhibition featuring Hong Kong artists Kongkee, Leung Chi Wo, May Fung, Law Yuk Mui and MAP Office together with Berlin-based Japanese artist Yukihiro Taguchi opened at the gallery of our partner Momentum in Kunstquartier Bethanien on 1 October through 29 November. The VIDEO TALKS with Kongkee and Taguchi moderated by the founder of the project Angelika Li on 3 October accidentally coincided with the Germany Reunification Day. Further discussions followed with the audience after the talk with ad-hoc interviews conducted, views of 'homeland' shared and some local Berliners' experiences collected. Our project is indebted to their valuable contributions and grateful for their participations. Thank you very much! Vielen Dank! ​ Concurrently during the Berlin exhibition period on 30 and 31 October, five video works with strong notions of water by Kongkee, Taguchi and MAP Office were interwoven with and BY THE RIVER RHINE at the outdoor video installation at a heritage-listed building on the well-known Florastrasse in Kleinbasel under the rare blue moon on 30 & 31 October. To the neighbours' surprise, the building has temporarily turned into a house with moving images running and moving around on the exterior. If one went closer to the building, sounds from the videos could be heard which added other layers to their immediate environment by the River Rhine. Another accidental coincidence was the rare blue moon rise which was not known during the planning phase and it miraculously offered the most dreamlike backdrop for Kongkee's two works from his 'Moon in the River' series. Our team hoped that this project also did act as a tool to cheer up and inject some energies to the communities around the area during the pandemic times. In November, Kulturkreis Zollikon has announced that 4 - 21 March, 2021 are the new dates for our exhibition HEIMAT im WANDEL at Villa Meier Severini co-curated by Martin Brauen and Angelika Li. The new programme from the organiser and the event with Asia Society Switzerland will be updated in due course. A new chapter of exhibition is being targeted to happen in Basel in June, 2021. *updated as at 8 February 2021: The exhibition has been further postponed to 5-22 May 2022. ​ Stay tuned for more updates of our new journeys in 2021. We wish you all a healthy and fruitful year ahead! ​ ​ ​ 2020 PROGRAMME OUTDOOR VIDEO SCREENING BY THE RIVER RHINE 30 - 31 OCTOBER FLORASTRASSE 45 BASEL, SWITZERLAND ​ ​ HOMELAND in TRANSIT BY THE RIVER RHINE ​ Artists Kongkee MAP Office Yukihiro Taguchi ​ Curator Angelika Li in collaboration with Donald Mak and Edward Wang on Visual Design 30th – 31st October 2020 19-22h Florastrasse 45, 4057 Basel ​ We screen five video works by three artists from Hong Kong and Japan: ‘River’ and ‘I just can't find myself, most of the time’ (2020) from Kongkee's 'Moon in the River' series; ‘Magu ’ (2012) and ‘Terasu ’ (2015) by Yukihiro Taguchi and ‘The Book of Waves’ (2018) by MAP Office which delve into the notions of self-searching, identity, memory, and our resilience as humans. The intrinsic and characteristic element of Hong Kong – Water – occupies a strong presence around the heritage-listed house at Florastrasse 45 which, as a vessel, perpetuates the stories and energies to the River Rhine and the next destinations. Come join us in this experience where art, architecture and water interweave in the continuing exploration of HOMELAND in TRANSIT. The total duration of the videos is approximately 20 minutes and all can be viewed from the outside. ​ Due to COVID-19 restrictions, visitation is limited to 15 persons. We kindly ask you to click this link and select a 30 minute timeslot for your visit. ​ We will be respecting current COVID-19 regulations. Please wear a mask. Thank you for your understanding and support in maintaining our mutual health and safety. ​ EXHIBITION+ VIDEO TALKS 1 OCTOBER - 29 NOVEMBER KUNSTQUARTIER BETHANIEN BERLIN, GERMANY ​ ​ HOMELAND in TRANSIT next stop: BERLIN Angelika Li, Basel, Autumn 2020 The word ‘homeland’ evokes a physical and permanent form on the surface, yet when we dive a little deeper into our memories and emotions, the word urges us to reflect on its complex and shifting nature. The inaugural exhibition of HOMELAND in TRANSIT in 2019 channeled narratives of ‘homeland’ from Hong Kong perspectives: the floating islands, borders and boundaries, unfolding histories of diaspora, the metamorphosis of cultural identity, colonial ideology and beyond. In only a few months, our world has changed dramatically and each word in this title has developed a wider scope of meanings and expanded relevance: we feel an urgent need to further communicate and encourage more exchanges and discussions. The HOMELAND in TRANSIT VIDEO TALKS launched in Basel in February 2020 continues the exchange and leads to the next exhibition taking place at MOMENTUM, Kunstquartier Bethanien, Berlin in October 2020 with time-based works by 7 artists from Hong Kong and a Berlin-based Japanese artist exploring the notions of migration, self-searching, cultural identity, memory, and our resilience as humans. An intrinsic and characteristic element of Hong Kong - water - occupies a strong presence. Continue to the curator's notes Artists May FUNG Kongkee LAW Yuk Mui LEUNG Chi Wo MAP Office (Valerie Portefaix & Laurent Gutierrez) Yukihiro TAGUCHI ​ Curator Angelika Li Exhibition: 1 October - 29 November, 2020 1 October – 1 November 2020: Wednesday – Sunday 1-7pm 2 – 29 November 2020: Due to the November Lockdown, the gallery is open only by appointment on info@momentumworldwide.org VIDEO TALKS: 3 October, Sat 1600-1900 Angelika Li in conversation with Kongkee and Yukihiro Taguchi Scroll down for the link ​ Venue: MOMENTUM , Kunstquartier Bethanien, Mariannenplatz 2, Berlin ​ Co-presented by ​ ​ ​ ​ MAP OFFICE ‘The Book of Waves’ (2018), animation, duration: 2 min. 250 hand drawings on computer screen inspired by Ha Bun Shu by Mori Yuzan, 1917 Sound recorded around Shek O Headland, 2018. MAP Office’s ‘The Book of Waves’ (2018) brings to mind the often forgotten natural geography of Hong Kong, which consists of more than 260 individual islands, though it is better known as a densely populated modern cityscape. Engulfed in the sound of waves recorded from Hong Kong’s Shek O Beach and Big Wave Bay, MAP’s video animation of 250 hand-drawn waves and ripples in the nihonga style takes as its starting point the ‘Ha Bun Shu’ of Mori Yuzan, an archive of waves drawn from the Edo period. To achieve the quality of an animation, the artist duo had to imagine what the missing links of waves would be in order to weave the stories together. The traditional technique of handwork merges with new technology through the form of animation. MAP construct their own representation of the oceans around the world, which is the core of their current research. Not only does this work reflect the ocean condition, it also metaphorically represents the life of our city as ups and downs, calm and unsettling, in between the foreseeable and unpredictable. The water element recalls the controversial scientific theory by French scientist Jacques Benveniste that water retains its own memory. If these are all true, can we presume that water also carries evidence of our history? MAP OFFICE 'The Book of Waves' (2018) Inkjet print on 160gsm Japanese Art Paper. Paper: 27 x 16.2 cm. Box: 28.4 x 17.6 cm. In a box, numbered, with certificate. Viewing upon request by appointment. Edition of 3/7 LEUNG CHI WO ‘My name is Victoria’ (2008) video, duration: 21 min. 30 sec. Edition of 5 Leung’s practice primarily draws from references and archives with history as a subject matter. He often digs up small details and reveals unknown facts. Eleven years after Hong Kong’s sovereignty changed hands from Britain to China in 1997, the artist created this work in 2008 to explore the perception and interpretation of the name ‘Victoria’. This video work unveils an unfamiliar route in the city: starting from Victoria Road in Kennedy Town, the border of Victoria which was the former capital of the crown colony, to Aberdeen where the British, under the reign of Queen Victoria, landed for the first time in Hong Kong in 1841. Through an open call on the internet, the artist collected forty women’s stories behind their name ‘Victoria’ which are narrated by a soft female voice in a distinctive British accent with music by Franz Schubert playing in the background. The light-hearted atmosphere in the video juxtaposes the heavy cultural and political issues the work is concerned with. The name ‘Victoria’ carries a majestic air and represents a time in the past in the Hong Kong context. In these stories, one notices how different generations think about naming and in the artist’s curiosity on how a name is re-interpreted over time and across cultures and beliefs play. Once a foreign name is transplanted, new meanings are born. Leung brings up these multiple layers of naming with irony and wit. The proper phonetic transliteration for Victoria in Cantonese is ‘Wai Dor Lei Nga’ which connotes a majestic and elegant air. But it is commonly written as ‘Wik Dor Lei’ literally meaning ‘Region of Profit’ which reflects certain local values and also contradicts or even ridicules the regal background of the name. How does history and the knowledge of history shape our perception and self-recognition? LAW YUK MUI ‘On Junk Bay, The Plant’ (1990-present), duration: 2 mins 56 secs. Cyanotype of plants from Junk Bay Moving from Victoria Road to the opposite side of the Victoria harbour of Hong Kong – we find Junk Bay, now known as Tseung Kwan O (TKO). The earliest inhabitants of the area can be traced back to the 13th Century and major settlements dated back to the late 16th Century when small fishing villages were formed. With its geographical advantage, shipping industries emerged in the 1960s until 1982 when the local government kicked off the development of TKO as a new town which saw a chain of humongous reclamation constructions. Notably, the government never addressed the old name ‘Junk Bay’. In ‘On Junk Bay, The Plant’ (1990-present), Law Yuk Mui leads us to revisit the geographical history and metamorphosis of Junk Bay, where the artist used to live. Her lens captures the natural landscape of the area mixed with the history of its phenomenal land development through reclamation where foreign plants were transplanted and re-rooted. Through her investigation of Hong Kong cartography and passion in geology, the narratives delve deeper into the contemplation of migration, native vs foreign, borders and the relationship or negotiation between human and nature. Using plants as metaphors, foreign plants are like migrants and refugees transplanted to a new land, as in her parents’ migration from China to Hong Kong. As the speed in Hong Kong is always so fast, the artist strategically paces the video in slow motion to prolong 15 seconds of real life to create time to engage the audience with her subject matter. The distorted sound is excerpted from Hayao Miyazaki’s animation ‘Castle in the Sky’ with its tree trunks growing into the sky offering a sense of future and hope. MAY FUNG ‘Image of a City’ (1990), video, duration: 11 mins With rapid urbanisation in Hong Kong since the 1970s and an influx of migrants from China, how do we perceive the changes of our city and our own identity? May Fung is one of the most influential video artists at the forefront of experimental practice for over three decades in Hong Kong. Her work often interweaves local history, cultural landscapes, politics and poetics. Her two works ‘Image of a City’ (1990) and ‘She Said Why Me?’ (1989) offer images of Hong Kong through a time tunnel from the 1967 Hong Kong riots to the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests with footage drawn from the Hong Kong Government Record Service. Cityscapes marked with architectural references that reflect the parallel worlds of both Chinese and British, the artist channels out her emotions and memories along the pivotal transformations or negotiations between the two worlds in one city. The anxiety and frustration expressed in the works have become self-fulfilling prophecy. What the footages depict keep resurfacing through our timeline, as seen in the recent movements in Hong Kong and other parts of the world. Recordings of scholar Ackbar Abbas’ lecture on the notion of ‘culture in a space of disappearance’ guides us through ‘Image of a City’ (1990): “Hong Kong…has never seized being a port, a door, a threshold, a passage way. It is a space in transit. Everything is provisional, temporary and ad hoc.” Overlapping the voice of Abbas in the video is Margaret Thatcher’s speech on ‘one country, two systems’. Abbas described Hong Kong as “not so much a place as a space of transit,” whose residents consider themselves as transients and migrants on their way from China to the next place. What is disappearing? Is it something visible or intangible? Is it our heritage and identity or sense of belonging? Is it the memory of our past or our imagination of the future? MAY FUNG ‘She Said Why Me’ (1989), video, duration: 8 mins The narratives of disappearance and the cityscapes linger with a strong sense of frustration and self-searching in ‘She Said Why Me’ (1989) in which a blind-folded female protagonist starts her journey from a Tin Hau temple where traditionally fishermen in Hong Kong worship and pray to the deities for protection in the waters. The artist uses the temple as a form of attachment to her heritage. Interwoven with historical footages with focal points or quasi surveillance on women, the protagonist transits into the modern cityscape of Central finding her way along the monuments that represent the colonial era. At one point, she loses her blindfold yet she still moves like a sleep-walker. When she comes to realise her blindfold is no longer there, she starts running aimlessly, but from what and where to? Seemingly lost with a sense of displacement and despair, the woman acts as the artist’s outlet of emotions, vents out her emotions and frustrations about her gender, cultural identity, the transformation of our city during this self-searching process. At the pivotal junction on Queen’s Road Central, she turns and stares back sharply at the camera with anger and fear: ‘Why me?’ She then finds her way, though blindfolded, back to where she came from. That leads us back to the sea, the notion of water. Kongkee ‘I just can't find myself, most of the time' (2020) Animation, 1 min. 56 sec. Greek philosopher Heraclitus had a famous analogy about life: “You cannot step twice into the same river”, which recalls the Chinese philosophy of change in the Yijing (I-Ching or Book of Changes): the only certainty is change, as such each moment is unique. Kongkees latest animations, created in 2020, are anchored by these concepts. Time cannot travel backward, everything is always in a state of becoming. During the process of making animation, with the help of software and tools, characters can flow fluidly back and forth in time, as though existing beyond time itself. Travelling between dimensions, pasts and futures and grabbing hold of the most precious moments; however, the ending has always already been drawn out for the animation characters. In “reality” we are unable to see the future and there is no way of reading the script of our lives. We are part of the current of time. There is a feeling that our destiny, unfinished, is still to be written. Both videos shown here are silent, focusing the viewers on the movements and visual expressions of the artist. Kongkee uses I can’t find myself, most of the time (2020) as a mouthpiece to project his state of mind. The motion and gestures of the walking man are those of a sleepwalker or someone in a state of dreaming. To the artist, dreaming also feels like walking through water. The walking man has a strong sense of direction but where is he heading? Could it be read as an analogy of the discoordination between the mind and body, consciousness and physical strength? In the water and above the surface, time is lapsing between the two realms. The work becomes a meditation for the artist to release his emotions from what can perhaps be felt – distress and powerlessness. Like a self-reflection, with his head being trapped in a box through the complex process of thinking, he does not seem to be able to escape from the situation. YUKIHIRO TAGUCHI ‘Magu’ (2012), stop-motion video, duration: 4 min. 49 sec. ‘Magu’ (2012) is a stop-motion animation set in Male, Maldives by Yukihiro Taguchi who deals with objects and memories of a place of transit. Male is the capital of the island country Maldives and it is a famous transit hotspot for tourists travelling to the other islands. The majority of its inhabitants consists of locals and migrants. Roaming around the island, the colourful island fabrics are rhizomic and absorbing imprints from daily elements of the vibrant island life - wall textures, manhole covers, iron grills and street signs - and the interactions in the local environment in every aspect. These fabrics become records of memories and spirits of the place and people. During Taguchi’s stay, he learns from the locals that certain colours represent certain cultural, political or religious ideals and identities, and some colours should be avoided. Colours carry different cultural, social and political meanings with them in every culture. This notion of colours also broadens the discussion of Leung’s exploration in ‘My name is Victoria’. Kongkee 'River' (2020) Animation, 5 min. 3 sec. In Kongkee’s River (2020) the familiar daily objects in Hong Kong are floating in the same direction as in I can’t find myself. The colours are vibrant yet the manifestation of the beaten, powerless or lifeless objects evoke fear, melancholia and darkness. What are their stories? Where are they going? Fear often comes from the unknown, uncertainty and instability. Based on the artist’s sensitivity in terms of challenging global situations, people are getting closer and building solidarity, exporting and importing ideas. Along this line of thought, the idea that construction is built on destruction is once again obvious. In reality, we are quite uncertain as to what is coming in the future and can we really write the script and storyboard of our lives like in an animation? In the artist’s words: “there is a feeling that our destiny, unfinished, is still to be written.” One might easily be drowned in this melancholic blackhole of current affairs and situations in her or his homeland. Humans are resilient. By going forward, one shall see hope. In the darkest hour, the slightest ray of light will illuminate the darkness and show us the way. YUKIHIRO TAGUCHI ‘Terasu’ (2015), stop-motion video, during: 4 min. 44 sec. ‘Terasu’ is a Japanese word meaning ‘to illuminate’. Taguchi contemplates on the notion of darkness and light. It was during the winter time when he was invited to create a site-specific project in Arnsberg, Germany. What would the strategy be when the sky goes dark so early? Taguchi applies his survival instinct to use fire and he starts by the most primitive method – hand drilling. The artist draws with the fire across the town in lines and signs, creating soul-like energies. Like a magic touch harmonising the contradictory the yin and yang, using fire to draw a boat and a waterscape. At the end, the fire is transferred onto torches, and the people from the town draw the signs that represent themselves and their place. These are records of the collective memories and solidarity of people. ​ VIDEO TALKS online ​ ​ ​ LEUNG Chi Wo x Valerie Portefaix/MAP Office in conversation with Angelika Li 20 September 2020 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ May FUNG x LAW Yuk Mui Screened in Basel on 25 February 2020 ​ Kongkee x Yukihiro Taguchi in conversation with Angelika Li VIDEO TALKS in Berlin on 3 October 2020 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ EXHIBITION HEIMAT IM WANDEL 05-22 MAY, 2022 (POSTPONED FROM 2020) VILLA MEIER-SEVERINI ZOLLIKON, SWITZERLAND PROGRAMME UPDATES TO COME SOON. PROGRAMME (POSTPONED FROM 2020): ​ The inaugural exhibition in 2019 of the curatorial project HOMELAND in TRANSIT channeled narratives of ‘homeland’ from Hong Kong perspectives: borders, boundaries, roots, diaspora, cultural identity, colonial ideologies and beyond. In the new chapter in 2020 with the German title HEIMAT im WANDEL, Martin Brauen and Angelika Li form a curatorial partnership to interweave the different perspectives and experiences of Bern-based Tibetan artist Sonam Dolma Brauen and six Hong Kong artists Hung Fai, Lee Ka Sing, Leung Chi Wo, MAP Office, Lulu Ngie and Wai Pong Yu. The word ‘homeland’ has complex meanings: a clearly defined place/space, a tradition/culture that you share with others, a common history, belonging to a certain community in which you feel at home - and thus also feelings such as security and trust. It evokes a permanent form on the surface, yet when we dive a little deeper into our memories and emotions, the word urges us to reflect on its shifting nature. The definition of ‘homeland’ fluctuates under socio-political pressures which can lead to alienation and discontent, and potential fragmentations in our societies. Despite many differences, Tibet and Hong Kong share something in common: the sense of homeland of its inhabitants is constantly being questioned and reinterpreted. How do artists perceive these transformations and how do they represent it in their art? Venue: Villa Meier-Severini, Zollikerstrasse 86, 8702 Zollikon, Switzerland ​ Exhibition organised by Kulturkreis Zollikon Artist Biographies Press / Enquiry HUNG Fai 熊輝 VESSEL IV 2019 Ink on Chinese Paper 136 x 69 cm Sonam Dolma, Yishen 28, 2014, 94 x 138 cm MAP Office (Laurent Gutierrez, Valérie Portefaix) HONG KONG IS OUR MUSEUM 2006 White neon mounted on WAI Pong Yu韋邦雨 LAKEDREAM 2 2019 Ballpoint pen on paper 68 x 100 cm Sonam Dolma, Yishen 71 2016 Acrylic on Canvas 34x34 cm Sonam Dolma, Abschied No 3 2017 Acrylic on Canvas 140 x 100 cm WAI Pong Yu韋邦雨 A RHYTHM OF LANDSCAPE 9 2019 Ballpoint pen on paper 57.5 x 68.4 cm LEE Ka Sing 李家昇 THE PART OF HISTORY THAT HAS NEVER BEEN TOLD 2010 Photographic work 40.64 x 50.8 cm Lulu NGIE倪鷺露 RECOGNISING IT 2019 Ink on paper mounted on silk 215 x 95 cm LEE Ka Sing 李家昇 EVERYBODY SAID CAMEL WAS THE FATHER OF GPS 2011 Editions: 4/10 & 5/10 Sonam Dolma, Gone with the wind LEUNG Chi Wo 梁志和 MY NAME IS VICTORIA 2008 Video: HDV, PAL, 21 min. 30 sec. Artist book: 15 x 21 cm Sonam Dolma, My Fathers Death WAI Pong Yu A MOMENT OF TRUTH 57 2019 Archival Ballpoint Pen on Japanese Art Paper 29.7cm x 21cm WAI Pong Yu A MOMENT OF TRUTH 55 2019 Archival Ballpoint Pen on Japanese Art Paper 29.7cm x 21cm Upper: WAI Pong Yu A GOLDEN BOUGH 3 2019 Archival black water pigmented ink, silver ballpoint pen, w WAI Pong Yu A Golden Bough 3, 2019, deta MAP Office (Laurent Gutierrez, Valérie P VIDEO TALKS FEBRUARY 2020 BASEL, SWITZERLAND We are very proud to present video works by Hong Kong artists May Fung and Law Yuk Mui in the first HOMELAND in TRANSIT VIDEO TALKS. The two artists will appear in Basel by means of video during the sharing session. ​ May Fung’s two works offer images of Hong Kong through a time tunnel from the 1967 Hong Kong riots to the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests with footage drawn from the Hong Kong Government Record Service. Recordings of scholar Ackbar Abbas’ lecture on the notion of ‘culture in a space of disappearance’ guides us through ‘Image of a City’ (1990) while the narratives of disappearance linger with a strong sense of self-identity-searching in ‘She Said Why Me’ (1989). Image of a City (1990), video duration: 11 mins She Said Why Me (1989), video duration: 8 mins Law Yuk Mui’s ‘On Junk Bay, The Plant’ (1990-present) leads us to revisit the geographical history and transformation of Junk Bay, later known as Tseung Kwan O, a reclaimed-land area in Hong Kong where the artist used to live. Her lens not only captures the natural landscape of the area but also the history of its phenomenal land development through reclamation where foreign plants migrated, were transplanted and re-rooted. Through her investigation of Hong Kong cartography and passion in geology, the narratives delve deeper into the contemplation of migration, native vs foreign, borders and the relationship or negotiation between human and nature. ​ On Junk Bay, The Plant (1990-present), video duration: 3 mins ​ About the Artists ​May Fung is a video artist at the forefront of experimental practice for over three decades in Hong Kong. She is also a filmmaker, curator and art critic. Her work often interweaves local history, cultural landscapes and politics. ​Using image, sound and installation as her mediums of preference, and adopting the methodology of field study and collecting, Law Yuk Mui often intervenes in the mundane space and daily life of the city and catches the physical traces of history, psychological pathways of human, the marks of time and the political power in relation to geographic space. Law often digs beyond the surface, through which she would recover fragments of narratives and micro histories. ​ ​ Limited seating of 30. RSVP is essential. Location provided upon RSVP. Please bring a non-native plant. The HOMELAND in TRANSIT VIDEO TALKS programme is in partnership with cmbb (culture matters beyond borders, Hong Kong) 1/1 ​ Thank you very much for joining us at our first HOMELAND in TRANSIT VIDEO TALKS which was launched in Basel on Tuesday 25th February in which we presented Hong Kong artists May Fung and Law Yik Mui’s video works. Many congratulations to the two artists on the first presentation of their works in Switzerland. ​ A big thank you to the audience who brought us non-native plants and shared with us their stories to make the video installation of Law Yuk Mui’s ‘Junk Bay, The Plant’ (1990-present) more alive. Stay tuned as the installation will continue to grow in Basel. ​ Thank you again to the two Hong Kong artists May Fung and Law Yuk Mui for making a video conversation for our VIDEO TALKS in Basel, especially during this difficult time of the coronavirus outbreak in Hong Kong. Our thoughts go to the Hongkongers. ​ 28th February 2020 Contact Us

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